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8 401(k) Investing Tips to Maximize Your 401(k)

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The best kind of 401(k) plan is one that is used. The employer-sponsored retirement plan is typically easy to open and fund (with pre-tax dollars often deducted straight from your paycheck), and offers tax benefits vs. saving and investing in a brokerage account.

Understanding the nuances of this all-important savings vehicle may help catapult investors into full-blown expert territory, helping them maximize their 401(k) investing.

While everyone’s financial and retirement situation is different, there are some useful 401(k) investing tips that could be helpful to anyone using this popular investment plan to boost their retirement savings. These 401(k) should apply no matter what stage of retirement saving you’re in—as long as you’re participating in a 401(k).

1. Take Advantage of Your Employer Match
2. Consider Your Circumstances Before Contributing the Match
3. Understand Your 401(k) Investment Options
4. Stay the Course
5. Change Your Investments Over Time
6. Find—and Keep—Your Balance
7. Diversify
8. Beware Early Withdrawals

#1 Take Advantage of Your Employer Match

This first 401(k) tip is admittedly basic, but also probably the most important. Understanding your employer match is essential to making the most of your 401(k).

Also called a company match, an employer match is a contribution made to your 401(k) by your employer, but only when you contribute to your account first.

Withdrawing money early from a 401(k) can result in a hefty penalty.

There are some exceptions, depending on what you’ll use the withdrawn funds for. For example, qualified first-time home buyers may be exempt from the early distribution penalty. But for the most part, if you know you need to save for some big pre-retirement expenses, it may be better to do so in a non-qualified account.

Another consideration is whether to put all of your eggs in your 401(k) basket. Of course, these accounts can offer big benefits in terms of tax deferral and may come with a matching contribution from your employer as well. But individuals who are eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA, may consider splitting contributions between the two accounts.

While 401(k) contributions are made with pre-tax dollars and taxes are paid when you make a withdrawal, Roth IRA contributions are the opposite—taxed on the way in, but not on the way out (with some exceptions).

If you’re concerned about being in a higher tax bracket at retirement than you are now, a Roth IRA can make sense as a complement to your 401(k). The caveat is that these accounts are only available to people below a certain income level.

#3 Understand Your 401(k) Investment Options

The first step is contributing to a 401(k); the second is directing that money into particular investments. Typically, plan participants are able to choose from a list of mutual funds to invest in for the long-term. Some 401(k) plans may give participants the option of a lifecycle fund or a retirement target-date fund.

To pick the right mutual funds, you may want to consider what is being held inside those mutual funds. For example, a mutual fund that is invested in stocks means that you are now invested in the stock market.

With each option, ask yourself: Does the underlying investment make sense for your goals and risk tolerance? Are you prepared to stay the course in the event of a stock market correction?

You may also want to consider the fees charged by your mutual fund options, because any management fee will be subtracted from your potential future returns. When analyzing your options, look for what is called the expense ratio—that’s the annual management fee.

#4 Stay the Course

Many investors will have at least a part of their 401(k) money invested in the stock market, whether through mutual funds or by holding individual stocks.

If you’re not used to investing, it can be tempting to panic over small losses. This is also known as a day-trader mentality, and it is one of the worst things you can do—especially with a 401(k). Remember, investing in the stock market is generally considered for the long haul.

Getting spooked by a dip (or even a stock market crash like the one in 2008) and pulling your money out of the market is generally a poor strategy, because you are locking in what could possibly amount to be “paper” or temporary losses. The thinking goes, if you wait long enough, that stock might rebound and your loss will go away. (Though as always, past performance is no predictor of future success.)

It may help to remember that although stock market crashes are disappointing, they are a normal and natural part of the growth cycle. Remember, the goal is to be patient and let the stock market do its thing.

Some investors find it helpful to only check their 401(k) balance occasionally, rather than obsess over day-to-day fluctuations.

#5 Change Your Investments Over Time

Lots of things change as we age, and one of the most important 401(k) tips is to change your investing along with it. While some principles of retirement saving are eternal—use the employer match as much as you can, don’t trade too much, pay attention to fees—some 401(k) advice is specific to where you are relative to retirement.

While everyone’s situation is different and economic conditions can be unique, one rule of thumb is that as you get closer to retirement, it makes sense to shift the composition of your investments away from higher risk but potentially higher growth assets like stocks, and towards lower risk, lower return assets like bonds.

There are types of funds and investments that manage this change over time, like target date funds, that make this strategizing easier. Some investors choose to make these changes themselves as part of a quarterly or annual rebalancing.

#6. Find—And Keep—Your Balance

While you may want your 401(k) investments to change over time, at any given time, you should have a certain goal of how your investments should be allocated: a certain portion in bonds, stocks, international stocks, American stocks, large companies, small companies, and so on.

But these targets and goals for allocation can change over time even if your allocations and investment choices don’t change. That’s because certain investments may grow faster than others and thus, by no explicit choice of your own, they take up a bigger portion of your portfolio over time.

Rebalancing is a process where, every year or every few months, you buy and sell shares in the investments you have in order to keep your asset allocation where it was at the beginning of the year.

For example, if you have 80% of your assets in a diversified stock market fund and 20% of your assets in a diversified bond fund, over the course of a year, those allocations may end up at 83% and 17%.

To address that, you might either sell shares in the stock fund and buy shares in the bond fund in order to return to the original 80/20 mix, or adjust your allocations going forward to hit the target in the next year.

#7 Diversify

In addition to employer matching, diversification is considered one of the few “free lunches” for investors. By diversifying your investments, you can help to lower the risk of your assets tanking while still being exposed to the gains of the market.

difference between stocks and bonds.)

Within stocks, diversification can mean investing in US stocks, international stocks, big companies, and small companies. But rather than, for example, owning shares in one big American company, one big Japanese company, a multi billion-dollar company, and a smaller company, it might make sense instead buy diversified funds in all these categories that are diversified within themselves—thus offering exposure to the whole sector without being at the risk of any given company collapsing.

#8 Beware Early Withdrawals

Perhaps the most important 401(k) tip is to remember that the 401(k) is designed for retirement, with funds withdrawn only after a certain age. The system works by letting you invest income that isn’t taxed until distribution. But if you withdraw from your 401(k) early, much of this advantage disappears.

With few exceptions, the IRS imposes a 10% tax penalty on withdrawals made before age 59½. That 10% tax is on top of any regular income taxes a plan holder would pay on 401(k) withdrawals. While withdrawals are sometimes unavoidable, the steep cost of withdrawing funds should be a strong reason not to, as it wipes away much of the gains that can come from 401(k) investing.

If you would like to buy a car or a house, or pay off debt, there are other options to explore. First consider pulling money from any accounts that don’t have an early withdrawal penalty, such as a Roth IRA (contributions can be withdrawn penalty-free as long as they’ve met the 5-taxable-year rule) or a brokerage account.

The Takeaway

If you have a 401(k) through your employer, you may want to consider taking advantage of it. Not only might you have a company match, but automatic contributions taken directly from your paycheck and deposited into your 401(k) may keep you from forgetting to contribute.

That said, a 401(k) is not the only option for saving and investing money for the long-term. One such option is a Roth IRA. While there are income limitations to who can use a Roth IRA, these accounts also tend to have a bit more flexibility when withdrawing funds than 401(k) plans. (If you don’t qualify for a Roth IRA, ask your tax professional for additional guidance.)

Another option is to open an investment account that is not tied to an employer-sponsored retirement plan. Sometimes called a brokerage or after-tax account, these accounts don’t have the special tax treatment of retirement-specific accounts, but can still be viable ways to save money for people who have maxed out their 401(k) contributions or are looking for an alternative way to invest.

Find out how SoFi Invest® can help you start saving for your future.


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).
2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
3) Digital Assets—The Digital Assets platform is owned by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, http://www.sofi.com/legal.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
WM14100

The post 8 401(k) Investing Tips to Maximize Your 401(k) appeared first on SoFi.

Source: sofi.com

The Risks of Playing The Stock Market

child's hand playing chess

To the uninitiated, the stock exchange can seem like a casino, with news and social media feeds sharing stories of investors striking it rich by playing the stock market. But while there are winners, there are also losers—those who lose money playing the market, sometimes pulling their money out of the market because they’re afraid of the potential of losing money.

Playing the stock market does come with investment risks. For new investors learning how to play the stock market can be a frustrating, humbling, and in some cases, incredibly rewarding experience.

While investing is a serious business, playing the stock market does have an element of fun to it. Investors who do their research and tune into the news and business cycles can take advantage of trends that might better enable them to earn good returns on investment.

This is what you need to know about how to play the stock market, the risks involved, and what makes the market so alluring.

Playing the Stock Market: What Does it Mean?

Despite the phrase “playing” the stock market, it’s important to make the distinction between investing and gambling up front.

safe investment—in a way each investment can feel like a gamble. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the market is not a casino, and just because there’s risk involved doesn’t mean that “playing the market” is the same as playing roulette.

So what does “playing the stock market” actually mean? In short, it means that someone has gained access to and is actively participating in the markets. That may mean purchasing shares of a hot new IPO, or buying a stock simply because Warren Buffett did. “Playing,” in this sense, means that someone is investing money in stocks.

Playing the Market: Risks and Rewards

Learning how to play the stock market—in other words, become a good investor—takes time and patience. It’s good to know what, exactly, the market could throw at you, and that means knowing the basics of the risks and rewards of playing the market.

Potential Risks

In a broad sense, the most obvious risk of playing the market is that an investor will lose their investment. But on a more granular level, investors face a number of different types of risks, especially when it comes to stocks. These include market risk, liquidity risk, and business risks, which can manifest in a variety of ways in the real world.

A disappointing earnings report can crater a stock’s value, for instance. Or a national emergency, like a viral pandemic, can affect the market at large, causing an investor’s portfolio to deflate. Investors are also at the mercy of inflation—and stagflation, too.

For some investors, there’s also the risk of playing a bit too safe—that is, they’re not taking enough risk with their investing decisions, and as such, miss out on potential gains.

Potential Rewards

Risks reap rewards, as the old trope goes. And generally speaking, the more risk one assumes, the bigger the potential for rewards—though there is no guarantee. But playing the market with a sound strategy and proper risk mitigation tends to earn investors money over time.

Investors can earn returns in a couple of different ways:

•  By seeing the value of their investment increase. The value of individual stocks rise and fall depending on a multitude of factors, but the market overall tends to rise over time, and has fully recovered from every single downturn it’s ever experienced.
•  By earning dividend income. Dividends can also be reinvested, in order to further grow your investments.
•  By leaving their money in the market. It’s worth mentioning that the longer an investor keeps their money in the market, the bigger the potential rewards of investing are.

How to Play the Stock Market Wisely

Nobody wants to start investing only to lose money or otherwise see their portfolio’s value fall right off the bat. Here are a few tips regarding how to play the stock market, that can help reduce risk:

Invest for the Long-term

The market tends to go up with time, and has recovered from every previous dip and drop. For investors, that means that simply keeping their money in the market is a solid strategy to mitigate the risks of short-term market drops. (That’s not to say that the market couldn’t experience a catastrophic fall at some point in the future and never recover. But it is to say: History is on the investors’ side.)

Consider: If an investor buys stocks today, and the market falls tomorrow, they risk losing a portion of their investment by selling it at the decreased price. But if the investor commits to a buy-and-hold strategy—they don’t sell the investment in the short-term, and instead wait for its value to recover—they effectively mitigate the risks of short-term market dips.

Do Your Research

It’s always smart for an investor to do their homework and evaluate a stock before they buy. While a gambler can’t use any data or analysis to predict what a slot machine is going to do on the next pull of the lever, investors can look at a company’s performance and reports to try and get a sense of how strong (or weak) a potential investment could be.

Understanding stock performance can be an intensive process. Some investors can find themselves elbow-deep in technical analysis, poring over charts and graphs to predict a stock’s next moves. But many investors are looking to merely do their due diligence by trying to make sure that a company is profitable, has a plan to remain profitable, and that its shares could increase in value over time.

Diversify

Diversification basically means that an investor isn’t putting all of their eggs into one basket.

For example, they might not want their portfolio to comprise only two airline stocks, because if something were to happen that stalls air travel around the world, their portfolio would likely be heavily affected. But if they instead invested in five different stocks across a number of different industries, their portfolio might still take a hit if air travel plummets, but not nearly as severely as if its holdings were concentrated in the travel sector.

Use Dollar-cost Averaging

Dollar-cost averaging can also be a wise strategy. Essentially, it means making a series of small investments over time, rather than one lump-sum investment. Since an investor is now buying at a number of different price points (some may be high, some low), the average purchase price smooths out potential risks from price swings.

Conversely, an investor that buys at a single price-point will have their performance tied to that single price.

The Takeaway

While playing the market may be thrilling—and potentially lucrative—it is risky. But investors who have done their homework and who are entering the market with a sound strategy can blunt those risks to a degree.

By researching stocks ahead of time, and employing risk-reducing strategies like dollar-cost averaging and diversification when building a portfolio, an investor is more likely to be effective at mitigating risk.

With SoFi Invest®, members can devise their own investing strategy, and play the market how they want, when they want. Whether you’re interested in short-term trading or have your eyes on a longer-term prize, SoFi Invest is a way to dip your toes into the stock market and start investing today.

Find out how to get started playing the stock market with SoFi Invest.


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).
2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
3) Digital Assets—The Digital Assets platform is owned by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, http://www.sofi.com/legal.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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The post The Risks of Playing The Stock Market appeared first on SoFi.

Source: sofi.com

Webull Review 2020: Investing Power in Your Pocket

This page may include affiliate links. Please see the disclosure page for more information. Webull believes that everyone should have an equal opportunity to control their financial future, and with their app, you can do just that. Let’s dig into our Webull review. What is Webull? It’s an iOS and Android online stock trading app that incorporates…

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How to Invest: A Basic Guide to Making Your Money Grow

Investing is more than just saving for the future — it’s about creating a wealth-building strategy to truly make your nest egg grow. That’s because investing typically earns you a higher interest rate than if…

The post How to Invest: A Basic Guide to Making Your Money Grow appeared first on Crediful.

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4 Easy Ways To Get Started With Real Estate Investing

If you’ve never considered real estate investing because you don’t want to own rental properties or be a landlord, you may want to look at these options.

The post 4 Easy Ways To Get Started With Real Estate Investing appeared first on Bible Money Matters and was written by Marc. Copyright © Bible Money Matters – please visit biblemoneymatters.com for more great content.

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Can You Lose Money with Trading Apps?

What steps can I take to protect my money when using a trading app? How do people lose money with trading apps?

The post Can You Lose Money with Trading Apps? appeared first on The Dough Roller.

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What Are Dividend Stocks? The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

Dividends can add a significant source of income to your investment portfolio. But what are dividend stocks exactly? Find out everything you need to know in this guide.Dividends can add a significant source of income to your investment portfolio. But what are dividend stocks exactly? Find out everything you need to know in this guide.

The post What Are Dividend Stocks? The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly appeared first on Money Under 30.

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